The Greatest Real Estate Luxury Money Can Buy

The Greatest Real Estate Luxury Money Can Buy

For anyone seeking year-round warm weather, ocean to mountain experiences and the best of dining, shopping and more, Los Angeles is the ideal place to call home. But for the ultra-wealthy, what appeals more than this sought-after location, is the ability to be invisible herein. 


For many home buyers, curb appeal is paramount in their real estate search as they must consider the future value of their investment. For celebrities and others for whom privacy is a major concern, standing out is not ideal as they do not want people to know where they live. They seek out "invisible homes."

An invisible home is hidden from the public's view. It offers the apex of seclusion and exclusivity-privacy that goes beyond a large front gate and high walls. These homes simply do not exist on maps, Google or otherwise.

"From GPS to satellite locating, it's become harder to stay off the grid," said Founding Partner and star of Bravo's Million Dollar Listing Los Angeles, Madison Hildebrand. "A neighborhood that offers such privacy is certainly one to likely tote it and attract clientele that demands it."

Hidden Hills, home to some of Hollywood's elite, is a prime example. The community covets its privacy, so much so that Google's mapping vehicles are banned from entering, and press interview are never given.

Writing for Financial Times, Kate Allen notes that "some of the world's most privileged people are choosing to hide from the public eye to protect their homes from burglars and other forms of unwelcome attention."

There are other communities much like Hidden Hills which go to great lengths to guard privacy, offering residents the ability to live under-the-radar, at least when they are home. "Attempts to avoid a property's detection can range from the small-scale to the colossal," wrote Allen. "At its most minute, location trackers such as GPS can be blocked using a jamming signal, preventing attempts to follow individuals."

The unique design of a home can also offer concealment. Architectural innovations include subterranean properties, and the Financial Times cites an experiment in London in which an architectural firm has plans for a home utilizing "layered mirrors that reflect its leafy surroundings, disguising its scale and form."

Other homeowners choose to take the properties entirely off the grid. "Some estimates suggest that 180,000 households are living off the grid in the US alone."